Seasonal Food Ideas: Two-Step Chimichurri

By Jonathan Doron

Let’s talk about what we can do with all of that parsley you just got in your farm share. If you’re like me, then you know that the sauce is the boss. Today we’re making chimichurri (aka “chimi”). It’s so easy to customize, and so versatile, you’ll have no problem finding a dish to include it in. Toss it together with some grilled vegetables (summer squash or potatoes), pour some on your favorite steak, or even smear it on a toasted baguette.

The foundation of chimi is very simple. You begin with garlic, red wine vinegar, olive oil, parsley, cilantro, salt, and pepper. If you’re in the camp where you think that cilantro tastes like soap, or are simply allergic, feel free to substitute it with an equivalent amount of parsley.

Once you’ve got this base, the recipe is super flexible. But, before you start going and practicing chimnastics, there’s two final decisions that you need to make. Whether or not you choose to include some form of onion and/or oregano is entirely up to you (I think they both add a nice flavor, and so should you). Be passionate about whichever combination you choose, and heckle anyone who tells you otherwise.

Now you can go crazy with whatever other additions suit your taste, or pair well with your final dish. For a spicy kick, red pepper flakes are hardly optional. Or, if you’re feeling weird, fresh jalapeño is also an option. If you like your sauce more or less acidic, feel free to adjust your ratio of vinegar and olive oil. Just don’t forget the red pepper flakes.

Ingredients

1 medium clove of garlic, minced or grated

1/2 cup red wine vinegar

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

3/4 cup roughly chopped flat-leaf parsley leaves and tender stems

1/4 cup roughly chopped cilantro leaves and tender stems

Kosher salt or sea salt to taste

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

1/2 cup yellow onion or scallion, finely chopped (optional)

2 tablespoons oregano leaves (optional)

1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes (optional-ish)

2 tablespoons minced stemmed and seeded jalapeño (optional)

Directions

Gather all the ingredients.


Throw everything in a medium-sized bowl, give it a good stir and season that bad boy with salt and pepper.

That’s it!

Farmer Feature with Park Ridge Organics

By Stefanie Jaeger

Unlike a lot of farmers, Robyn Calvey of Park Ridge Organics in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin didn’t grow up farming, but she can’t imagine doing anything else at this point. With a background and career in forestry and environmental advocacy, Robyn found herself moving back home in 2006 after her parents started farming in the early 2000’s.  

Robyn and her daughter Frances looking out over the field.

Robyn says of the early days, “My parents started to farm in 2003 with the desire to do something with their land that was really just laying fallow and they wanted to do something that could potentially bring an income. We laugh now because a market garden probably isn’t where that would happen but they wanted a little roadside stand. It’s not a beautiful story that they were hippies and wanted to save the environment or anything. They were approaching retirement and were looking for something good to do. This was 2003: the market for organic was just coming around the bend and they saw a window of opportunity and felt that certified organic was the way to go. They were also environmentally conscious people so it was also the right thing to do. In 2006 I moved home and introduced them to the CSA model after learning about it from my boss at the time.”

Pack house and office, Park Ridge Organics

To anyone out there thinking that sounds pretty easy, a cautionary tale awaits you. While Park Ridge Organics is now a successful 325 member CSA farm of 10 years, Robyn laughs when recalling the first year of starting the CSA.

“2007 was our first CSA year and we did awful. I had to call all the members the 2nd week and tell them we don’t have anything, we picked everything the first week. We had 13 members, most were family members or close friends. I remember picking all the broccoli and thinking “I don’t know what we are having next week” so we took a year off and came back in 2009 and did a reboot and started with 34 members. 5 of those members are still with us, 10 years later.”

Ask any farmer and they’ll tell you it’s about more than just growing vegetables. There is a vital connection to the land, the community, and to the people who eat the food you grown.

Farming is important to Robyn because “Agriculture is the root. We all eat, our food system is out of whack and I don’t expect that we’d move completely to a localized food system but people can understand the higher value products that you can get from a local food system. It’s fresher, less steps along the way to get to the consumer, and that is a higher value to me. I am big on providing a liveable wage for my employees so it can be a sole job for them and they are turning around and shopping at local stores and restaurants. Even choices we make on the farm – we could buy bags on Amazon but we go to this little store in Fond du Lac and we buy from them. We’ve talked about getting them cheaper elsewhere but that little old lady who runs the store asks me how my daughter is doing when I stop in to buy stuff…that matters. This circle is important.”

Robyn and her staff on the pack line of their first Havie shares

Just as our food systems have changed dramatically over the years, the way consumers are experiencing CSA has changed to. The traditional CSA model had always been for members to pay the full cost upfront, get what the farm grows with no say in what they might get, and hope there was no crop failure.

When asked about the future of CSA she says “The last few years people have been very doom and gloom about it (CSA) and that it’s plateauing and really, I think that is ok. I think if you aren’t changing with the trends in the consumer world then you are missing out. The trend is to go more customized. Why wouldn’t people want more of what they like when they are pre paying for it? I think it’s completely ok that it is changing. It’s still the CSA model; it’s not the original model of everyone getting a bushel of apples and that’s ok. That steers people away. Did they really want that bushel of apples or 20 bundles of kale in a 2 week period? I don’t think so.”

Pack line for the first Harvie delivery of 2018

As Robyn’s daughter Frances is bouncing around on her Mom’s lap trying to join in on the conversation and running around the pack house with her dad, Robyn reflects on the biggest lessons she’s learned on the farm over the past ten years.  

“You have to take moments to remember why you are doing it and separate yourself from the business part. Because if you get so caught up in trying to do everything right, it stops being fun. I do this with something as simple as walking to close up the buildings at night. I try to take a moment and look at it and be proud of everything here. I can get sucked into negative moments but I look around and those things aren’t really a big deal. The bigger picture is that we are going to send out $9,000 worth of vegetables tomorrow that will feed hundreds of families in our community. They are going to eat Park Ridge Organics vegetables and that feels good. Being present but not too present. You can’t control everything and not everything will turn out. That’s ok.”

No farm interview would be complete without a few fun questions so here we go:

Favorite vegetable to eat: celery.

Favorite vegetable to grow: also, celery.  

Favorite vegetable to eat fresh from the field: sun warmed green pepper, green beans and warm cherry tomatoes.

Favorite piece of farm equipment: red harvest knife, cell phone and the Harvie Website (as she laughs)

The infamous red knife

When asked if she has any final parting thoughts on life on the farm, Robyn says “Once I stopped worrying about the little things, you start to have better moments”.

She agreed this could apply to both farm life, and off-farm life. Words to live by…


Park Ridge Organics is a 15 acre Certified Organic Farm in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin with 7 acres in production. They serve Fond du Lac, Appleton, Neenah, Elkhart Lake and Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Visit them at www.parkridgeorganics.com and find their Harvie profile at www.harvie.farm/profile/park-ridge-organic. You can also follow them on Facebook.

Seasonal Food Ideas: Potato Hash Tacos

Potato Hash Tacos!

By Mike Q. Roth

The great thing about tacos is that you can make them out of most anything.  We’re a vegetarian household so we usually do our tacos with a base of beans or something like tofu, tempeh or seitan but we also like to use potatoes and sweet potatoes as an option to mix things up a bit.  As long as you have some tortillas, you’re well on your way.

Your farmshare can provide you with the raw materials for many different interesting taco combinations.  Today’s recipe for Potato Hash Tacos uses a bunch of stuff from my recent farmshare, a couple other things I picked up at the farm market this morning, some things that I just had on hand and a couple things from a trip to the local Mexican grocery.

The ingredients

  • 2 potatoes
  • 1 scallion
  • 1 garlic scape
  • 2 small carrots
  • 2 red radishes
  • 1 avocado (optional but always so good on tacos)
  • Cilantro (also optional but likewise it helps make the flavor pop, unless you of course hate cilantro, then avoid)
  • Cheese (optional)
  • Tortillas
  • Hot sauce
  • Rice Vinegar
  • Salt, Pepper, Paprika and whatever spices you might like

This amount of ingredients was enough for 4 tacos.  Another great thing about taco recipes: they are easily scalable.  Just chop more stuff if you’re feeding more people

Starting with the slaw (you want something crunchy on top of that taco!)

I made my slaw out of radishes and carrots – cutting them into small matchsticks and then letting them marinade in some rice vinegar and sprinkling them with some salt.  Prep these first and let them marinade while you prep the rest of the taco fillings.

You can make this with any number of things in your farmshare – carrots, radishes, beets, cabbage, turnips, kohlrabi…really anything crunchy.  Just chop it up into fine pieces that’ll go into a taco well and marinade. It’s that easy.

Making the taco filling (you want something hot in that taco!)

For the filling I just chopped up the potatoes into small cubes (1/8″ or so) and tossed them in the frying pan with a bit of olive oil.  Cook them up just like you are making hashbrowns/homefries. Let them get a bit brown and crispy. Sprinkle them with a little salt and pepper. I added some of that good Hungarian paprika to give them a bit of a smokey flavor.  

Right before the potatoes are done, I also tossed in the chopped up scallion and garlic scape. Fry that lightly and mix in with the potatoes.

Putting it all together

Once the potatoes are done, remove them from your frying pan but leave the pan on the heat.  I recommend taking your tortillas and tossing them in the pan to get them warmed up. If you are doing cheese on your taco, toss some on the tortillas and let it get melty (if that’s your thing).  Keep the heat down a bit and don’t leave them on too long or they start getting crunchy and burned. You just want to hit ‘em with a bit of heat to warm them up.

Scoop a couple tablespoons of potato hash into each tortilla, then a pile of the slaw on top of that, add some chopped up avocado on next, then the cilantro.  To finish things off, shake a little bit of hot sauce on there. After my wife and I spent two months in Mexico over the winter, we developed a bit of an affinity for Valentina and Salsa Huichol; highly recommended but you do you.

Preparation time

About 30-35 minutes from chopping to eating.  Probably a little faster if you team up with someone in the kitchen.

Recommended Listening

The Clash – self-titled album (just long enough to prepare the food and eat it)

Seasonal Food Ideas: Father’s Day Food Adventures

By Mike Cuccaro,  Harvie Development Crew

It’s Father’s Day so I got a chance to do one of my favorite things: cook! I love doing bulk cooking on Sundays with what I’ve gotten in my Harvie share from Rivendale Farms and had doubled up my order of pearl onions and chard this week to cook a big pot of beans. That’s the best thing for me about Harvie. The meal-planning aspect! Instead of figuring out what to do with 9 different things, I’ll narrow my choices to fit my narrow window of opportunity. So, let’s set to it.

First thing I did was cut up those pearl onions. But they were so beautiful whole, I couldn’t bring myself to chop them fine. Instead I figured I’d try quartering them. Because they’re going to get slow cooked and pearl onions taste good boiled whole I figured this could be a good compromise. Then, I got to the chard. One reason why I often swap kale for chard is that I don’t have any use for the kale stems but chard stems make a great soup base. I rip the leaves from the stems and then chop the stems up fine. At this point I get out the crock pot and fill the bottom with olive oil. Then I throw in the onions and chard stems to coat and get the flavor started.

While that’s going on, I go down to the pantry to select a bag of beans. We make regular orders to Rancho Gordo in California. I know it’s not local but these beans are amazing. I don’t think I’ve ever had even a single bad bean, much less a batch. I picked out some Goat’s Eye beans which are one of my standbys. You still have to rinse them up but I never presoak them. They are so good they don’t need it. Then, partly because it saves on counter space and partly because I enjoy the act, I rip up the chard leaves with my hands rather than chopping.

Next, I pour the soaked beans into the crockpot and mix them around with the savory veggies. I pour enough water over top to cover by about 2 inches. I never measure how much this is. Sorry. This is also the point where any bad beans will float up to the top and say, “I’m a bad bean. Get me out.” None floated up of course.

Last, I take the torn chard leaves and pile them on top. These are great for weighing down the beans and keeping them submerged so they’ll cook well. Then, just lid it and quit it! “Hey, where’s the salt, dude?” you might ask. That’s the trick to good dried beans. NO SALT until the very end. Otherwise they’ll harden on the outside.

After maybe half an hour after the chard has steamed down to a manageable pile I’ll submerge the leaves around the edge of the crockpot so they’re not burning to the sides of the crock pot.  After a few hours I’ll check the level of the water but otherwise just leave everything alone. In maybe another hour more I’ll test a bean. If it’s tender, then at this point I’ll add some salt and turn the beans down to warm until dinner time. We might serve with rice or bread or pasta. Meals for the week!

This particular day my wife had reminded me that we had some vegan chorizo that should have been eaten a few days earlier. So instead of spicing up the beans, I just browned the chorizo and let the beans mellow out the flavor and serve with chips.

I’d like to say I then enjoyed my Father’s Day gifts of the new release of the Who Live at the Fillmore East with some Dewars on the rocks after I got the kids to sleep but instead just passed out myself as soon as they were down. Real talk, right??

   

Cooking Simply: The Harvie Way

By Simon Huntley Founder and CEO, Harvie

Good morning fellow eaters!

Buying a farm share from a Harvie farmer is a great first step to culinary adventures and eating healthier, but now you need to take that beautiful, farm-fresh produce out of the box or bag and put it to good use in your kitchen!

Our philosophy at Harvie is that cooking is not about intimidating recipes and elaborate meals. Our obsessions with food TV like “Iron Chef” and “Chopped” make us feel like only the professionals can make food taste good. False. You can do this. Any chef knows that the ingredients make the dish – whether it’s a simple omelette or beef wellington. The point is, the quality of ingredients matter more than the number of ingredients and in your Harvie farm share you have the best ingredients!

Each week Harvie provides recipes and cooking ideas (look at the bottom of your emails) based on what your farmer grew for you that week. However, even more important is to get in the right mindset.

Here is Harvie’s Cooking Philosophy:

Fresh, high-quality ingredients from your local farmer is a great start for a simple and healthy meal

Every great meal, no matter how simple or complex, starts with high-quality ingredients. I find the joy of cooking is turning simple foods into something incredible. A simple omelette using farm-fresh eggs, spring asparagus and local goat cheese isn’t out of your reach: it’s exactly the way nature intended us to eat.

Back to Basics

Food should not be complicated. Taking a minimalist approach to preparations and recipes not only saves you time and your sanity, it allows the taste of the food to shine through. Don’t worry about making an Indian curry with 9 different spices (unless you want to!).

For example, with my first farm share of the season from Rivendale Farm in the Pittsburgh, PA area, I cooked up my kale as a simple stir fry and served it over rice noodles.

Helpful hint: Stir-fry of any kind is a simple way to use up veggies you have on hand. The right sauce makes the dish. Here is a staff favorite for homemade stir-fry sauce

Be Flexible

Learning how to substitute different vegetables or make variations of the same recipes to achieve different results is a way to keep your taste buds happy and your food waste low. In the stir-fry example, you could substitute swiss chard or spinach for the kale, and swap out rice noodles for cauliflower rice, brown rice, or soba noodles.

Learn techniques over recipes

As you start cooking more, you’ll become more comfortable with going off the script of a recipe. Learn some simple preparations and techniques like how to make a salad dressing or how to make vegetable soup, then these techniques can be applied to anything you have in your refrigerator. Be creative, it’s OK to fail.

Helpful Hint: Coming in July, Harvie is teaming up with Cook With What You Have to bring you a monthly lesson in basic kitchen techniques. 

Embrace leftovers, cook ahead

Cook, wash, and prepare in bulk when you have time and put the leftovers in the refrigerator. For example, when I get my lettuce home from my farm share, I immediately wash a big bowl of lettuce and put that in my refrigerator and then every time it is time for a meal, I have lettuce ready to eat. This means I eat a lot more lettuce because it is convenient and ready to go.

Helpful Hint: Use this “How to Store Your Farm Share” PDF print out to help you organize and store your share!

Enjoy the process of cooking

Slow down and enjoy the physical act of cooking. So many of us work in front of computers all day moving around 1s and 0s in digital space, but with cooking we have an opportunity to feel the food, to hear the sizzle of an onion, and the percussive pleasure of chopping a carrot. Take a little time to reflect on that carrot: it was grown in a particular field, on your farmer’s farm, weeded, watered, harvested, and washed by a person and delivered to you. Each carrot ties us to the land and the farm and the earth. Cooking is a moment to slow down and enjoy these connections and the timeless art of nourishing our bodies. It’s not a chore, it is one of life’s pleasures.

If you really don’t like something, don’t get it

For me, it’s beets. I want to like to beets, I really do. And everyone tells me that I will love them if I just figure out how to cook them. I’ve tried everything and I still don’t like beets. That’s OK, I simply mark my beets as a “0” in my preferences in Harvie and I’ll get more of something else I do like.

So, get out there and cook!

Are you having trouble with a particular item in your share? Send me an email back and I’ll try to help!

Did you cook something delicious with your Harvie farm share? Post your photo on social media tagged with #harviefarms or @harviefarms and send me a link!

In the coming weeks, we will open a Harvie member community on Facebook to allow you to share your creations and help you when you are stuck, so look out for an email on that soon.

Seasonal Food Ideas: Simple Kale Chips

Simple Kale Chips by Calien Fisher, Developer Crew at Harvie

This week was our first Rivendale share delivery here at Harvie headquarters, and the only thing cooler than seeing our system in action first hand was getting the fantastic fresh produce!

Everything in my Rivendale box was generously portioned, perfectly fresh and bundled, and all around awesome.

The first thing I made with my share was simple kale chips. My elder son (who is my hardest case when it comes to veggies) walked in while I was prepping them and said “are those kale chips?!”

They might not look like much, but they are easy and delicious!

Simple Kale Chips

Ingredients

1 bunch kale

1/2 tbsp olive oil (approx.)

seasonings of choice

Instructions

Cut the kale down from the top with kitchen scissors until the stem starts getting thick, then rip off any leaf remaining on the stalk.

Kale from Rivendale Farm

Place cut kale in a mixing bowl, add enough olive oil to very lightly coat the kale.

Add seasoning of choice (I just used salt, pepper, and garlic powder).

Toss/mix like you would a salad.

Arrange seasoned kale on a baking sheet (I used parchment paper to make clean up easier!).

Bake at 280 for 18 – 24 minutes, depending on how crispy you want your chips to be.

Enjoy!

CSA’s in Chicago

Angelic Organics

1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia, IL 61011-9572
815-389-2746
www.angelicorganics.com/
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Description: Angelic Organics is a certified organic farm that also used biodynamic farming practices. They were one of the first CSA’s in the Chicago area and have been offering their CSA for almost a quarter century. Angelic has over 1600 members and has a season beginning in mid-June and running through late-October.
CSA Cost: Full share (20 weeks) = $720, Bi-weekly share = $380
Features: weekly, bi-weekly, flex-share, extended-season, fruit, home-delivery,
Neighborhoods: on-farm, beloit, crystal-lake, lisle, naperville, rockford, wheaton, bucktown, deerfield, evanston-north, evanston-south, highland-park, lincolnshire, north-shore, oak-park-north, oak-park-south, ravenswood, pilsen, wilmette, winetka, arlington-heights, downers-grove, oak-brook, edison-park, park-ridge, elgin, elmhurst, la-grange, norwood-park, andersonville, edgewater, beverly, hyde-park-north, hyde-park-south, irving-park, lakeview, lincoln-park, logan-square, rogers-park, st-benedicts, uptown, wicker-park

King’s Hill Farm

19370 County Road G, Mineral Point, WI 53565
608-776-8413
www.kingshillfarm.com
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Description: Certified Organic family farm in Mineral Point, WI offering a traditional CSA. They offer both full and half-size vegetable shares as well as an add-on cheese share. Their main season runs from early-June to late-October.
CSA Cost: Full share (20 weeks) = $600, Half-size share (20 weeks) = $300, Chicago Botanic share (9 deliveries, bi-weekly) = $270
Features: traditional, organic, bi-weekly, cheese,
Neighborhoods: downtown, oak-park, north-branch, greencity, chicago-botanic-garden

Lake Breeze Organics

3522 Pier Road, Benton Harbor, MI 49002
269-762-0992
www.lakebreezeorganics.com
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Description: Lake Breeze Organics is a family-run, certified organic farm located near the eastern shores of Lake Michigan. Their CSA includes a combination of vegetables, herbs and fruits. They offer Large and Small shares and have an egg add-on option
CSA Cost: Large share = $550, Small share = $300
Features: traditional, eggs, organic,
Neighborhoods: ravenswood, downtown, evanston, north-side, north-center

Montalbano Farms

17551 Frazier Road, Sandwich, IL 60548
815-786-5700
www.montalbanofarms.com
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Description: Montalbano Farms is a small family farm that is currently Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) certified, uses organic growing practices and is working towards organic certification. Their 25-week CSA offers both traditional and customizable shares.
CSA Cost: Custom = start at $325, Large traditional = $1185, Medium = $645, Small = $325
Description: organic, custom, traditional, payment-plan, online-signup, online-payment
Neighborhoods: aurora, berwyn, lakeview, lincoln-square, logan-square-west, rogers-park, lincoln-park, dekalb, ukrainian-village, forest-park, geneva, township, lombard, oak-park, oswego, on-farm, sycamore, villa-park, wheaton, yorkville

Radical Root Farm

N/A
N/A
www.radicalrootfarm.com
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Description: A small family farm in Libertyville, IL growing organic vegetables and raising pastured animals. They offer traditional CSA shares in Spring, Summer and Fall seasons, as well as an add-on egg share
CSA Cost: Summer Share (18 weeks) = $605, Bi-weekly Summer = $360
Features: organic, traditional, eggs, bi-weekly
Neighborhoods: on-farm, libertyville, grayslake, logan-square

Tempel Farms Organics

17000 W. Wadsworth Road, Old Mill Creek, Illinois 60083
N/A
www.tempelfarmsorganics.com
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Description: Diversified farm located in Old Mill Creek, IL. Although not certified-organic, they grow all crops according to organic methods. Their pasture grown animals are raised on organic corn and soy based vegetarian feeds with no antibiotics or medications and enjoy plenty of fresh air. They offer a traditional CSA with add-ons such as fruit, flowers and turkey.
CSA Cost: Summer share, Large = $615, Bi-weekly = $375
Features: organic, traditional, bi-weekly, online-signup, online-payment
Neighborhoods: on-farm, gurnee, lake-bluff, mount-prospect, logan-square

The Gentleman Farmer

Barrington, IL
N/A
www.gentleman-farmer.com
Facebook
Description: The Gentleman Farmer provide an organically-grown traditional CSA. The summer season is 20-weeks and offers both full and bi-weekly shares.
CSA Cost: Full = $595, Bi-weekly = $325
Features: traditional, organic, online-signup
Neighborhoods: on-farm, barrington, logan-square

Tomato Mountain

N7720 Sandy Hook Road, Brooklyn, WI 53521
608-335-1198
www.tomatomountain.com
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Description: Certified-organic farm in Brooklyn, WI offering home delivery of their traditional-style CSA
CSA Cost: Large = $540, Medium = $360, Small = $240, Solo = $165
Features: traditional, organic, home-delivery
Neighborhoods: home-delivery

Willow Ridge Organic Farm

P.O. Box 323, Wauzeka, WI 5382
608-306-0538
www.willowridgeorganicfarm.com
Description: A 40-year old organic farm offering an 18-20 week CSA.
CSA Cost: Full = $550, Partial = $400, Mini = $250
Tags: organic, traditional
Neighborhoods: arlington-heights, portage-park, elgin, old-irving, logan-square

CSA’s in Pittsburgh

Cherry Valley Organics

518 Joffre Cherry Valley Road, Burgettstown, PA 15021
814-571-3428
www.cherryvalleyorganics.com
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Description: Cherry Valley Organics is a certified organic producer of a wide variety of agricultural products, and is located in Cherry Valley (between the towns of Hickory and Burgettstown), Washington County, Pennsylvania, only 20 miles from downtown Pittsburgh.
CSA Cost: $750 for 30 weeks, customizable box
Features: organic, customizable, payment-plan, flexible-schedule, recipe-help
Neighborhoods: mt-lebanon, squirrel-hill, canonsburg, southpointe, upper-st-clair, crafton-heights, oakdale, sewickley, new-brighton, burgettstown, columbiana(oh)

Sign up for a Cherry Valley Organics customizable share with

Rivendale Farm

1357 Valleyview Road, Bulger, PA 15019
412-956-9873
www.rivendalefarms.com
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Description: Rivendale Farms is a newly operational diversified farm growing with organic practices in Robinson Township, PA, approximately 20 miles from downtown Pittsburgh. The farm consists of approximately 8 acres in mixed vegetables, wheat, herbs, and flowers. The farm also includes Jersey dairy cows, sheep, and a flock of free-range laying hens as well as mushrooms, honey, and maple syrup production. Rivendale prioritizes a diverse mixture of high quality organically grown produce.
CSA Cost: $500 for a 20-week season
Features: organic, customizable, payment-plan, flexible-schedule, recipe-help
Neighborhoods: northside, morningside, more-TBD

Sign up for a Rivendale Farm customizable share with

 

Who Cooks For You

383 Mill Seat Run Rd. New Bethlehem, PA 16242
814-256-3858
www.whocooksforyoufarm.com
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Description: Certified Naturally Grown Farm with 3 CSA Styles Available.
Farmers Market Choice CSA: A very popular ‘you choose’ flexible style CSA in Pittsburgh at East Liberty, Squirrel Hill and Bloomfield Farmers Markets. 29-weeks Begins and Ends with the Farmers Markets listed. Traditional Delivery CSA delivers 25-weeks of super fresh produce from early June to the end of October. Three share sizes; Joyride (Small), Nuts n Bolts (Medium), Gusto (Large).
Harvie Choice Delivery CSA: Curate your own box! We deliver 25-weeks of super fresh produce of your choice from early June to the end of October.
Winter CSA: At a time when it’s difficult to find local produce, we help pull you through December and January offering 5 deliveries of produce. Can’t beat fresh greens and local roots at this time of year!
CSA Cost:
Features: certified-naturally-grown, market-style, payment-plan, customizable, flexible-schedule, recipe-help
Neighborhoods: highland-park, oakland, lawrenceville, northside, regent-square, squirrel-hill, strip-district, east-liberty, sewickley, ford-city, downtown, morningside, greenfield, new-bethlehem, on-farm

Sign up for a Who Cooks For You customizable share with 

Blackberry Meadows Farm

7115 Ridge Rd, Natrona Heights, PA 15065
724-226-3939
blackberrymeadows.com
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Description: Certified Organic farm offering Summer, Fall and Winter shares that run from June through December in three sizes (half, basic, plus). Provides a grow-your-own option for DIY or limited income families called the Garden Share. Discounted prices for on-farm pickup.
CSA Cost: Delivered prices for Summer Shares: Half = $259, Basic = $525, Plus = $970, Garden Share = $150
Features: organic, workshare, payment-plan, coffee, meat, eggs, bi-weekly, winter, newsletter,
Neighborhoods: on-farm, natrona-heights, oakland, fox-chapel,

Brenckle’s Organic Farm and Greenhouse

768 Glen Eden Rd, Zelienople, Pa 16063
724-774-2239
www.brencklesfarm.com/
Facebook
Description: Certified-organic, 23-week CSA that comes in three sizes. Any of the sizes can be purchased as a bi-weekly share as well. Reduced sugar/starch shares also available
CSA Cost: Weekly share prices: Small=$495, Medium=$633, Large=$725
Features: organic, traditional, bi-weekly, low-sugar
Neighborhoods: on-farm, ambridge, oakland, sewickley, chippewa, cranberry-township, harmony, zelienople, north-hills, strip-district, wexford, point-breeze, lawrenceville, regent-square, squirrel-hill, northside

Edible Earth Farm

Tionesta, PA
814-303-9663
edibleearthfarm.com
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Description: Certified Organic farm offering a 20-Week Summer CSA as well as a Winter CSA. Summer CSA products include a Choice CSA and Traditional CSA. Members have access to a private, online webstore where they can purchase additional products like: chicken, pork, eggs, cheese, honey, maple syrup, bulk produce, fruit, mushrooms, coffee and canned goods
CSA Cost: Non-Choice CSA Price = Small $425, Large $550. Choice CSA Price = Small $490, Large $625
Features: organic, winter, choice
Neighborhoods: tionesta, oil-city, cranberry-township, wexford, franklin-park, carnegie, greentree, mt-lebanon, south-hills, dormont, southside, downtown, lawrenceville, millvale, oakmont, fox-chapel, clarion, mt-washington, regent-square, point-breeze, squirrel-hill, oakland, shadyside, friendship, bloomfield, highland-park, morningside

Harvest Valley Farm

125 Ida Lane, Valencia, PA 16059
724-816-0853
harvestvalleyfarms.com
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Description: A ‘choose what you want’ CSA with weekly add-ons of fruit, eggs and grass-fed beef. Add-on shares include cheese and coffee. Weekly newsletter and very flexible payment schedule. The only pickup sites are: the farm (125 Ida Lane, Valencia, PA) or RAW Training (2330 Wildwood Road, Gibsonia, PA)
CSA Cost: Regular = $550, Large = $610, Bi-weekly = $285
Features: choice, coffee, cheese, fruit, beef, eggs, payment-plan,
Neighborhoods: valencia, gibsonia, on-farm,

Kretschmann Farm

257 Zeigler Rd., Rochester, PA 15074
724-452-7189
www.kretschmannfarm.com
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Description: Certified organic since before there was organic. Widest variety of vegetables plus apples, berries and other fruit all part of the CSA. Summer season CSA, 25 weeks starts in early-June and ends Thanksgiving. Winter season starts December. 3-sizes of vegetable/fruit CSA. Add-on shares for coffee, mushrooms, cheese and chicken. Bulk ordering for preserving too. Weekly personal newsletter with news and farm tested recipes. We also keep track of your personal preferences. Through our ASC (Agriculture Supported Community) we also support those who struggle to keep good food on the table.
CSA Cost: $625– Standard Share, $750–Plus Share,$500–Light Share
Features: organic, vegetables, fruit, coffee, mushrooms, cheese, chicken, payment-plan
Neighborhoods: squirrel-hill, regent-square, east-end, fox-chapel, franklin-park, gibsonia, penn-hills, mcKnight-road, ingomar, oakmont, point-breeze, thompson-run, greenfield, highland-park, lawrenceville, oakland, shadyside, morningside, friendship, aliquippa, hopewell, ben-avon, beaver, brighton-heights, baldwin, carnegie, crafton, churchill, moon-township, mt-washington, northside, rochester, westview, sewickley, bradford-woods, bridgeville, cranberry-township, harmony, dormont, castle-shannon, mt-lebanon, mars, uppe-st-claire, warrendale, wexford, wilkinsburg, mcknight-road, center-township, new-sewickley, seven-fields, zelienople

Penns Corner Farm Alliance

150 54th St, Pittsburgh, PA 15201
412-363-1971
www.pennscorner.com
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Description: Description: Penn’s Corner Farm Alliance is a cooperative of 30+ farmers that provides CSA options year-round. In addition to the regular fruits and vegetables, boxes regularly include honey, cheese, eggs, grains, value added products, etc. Vegan and gluten-free share options are available. PCFA also offers separate egg, cheese and flower shares. Not 100% organic but several of the 30 member farms are Certified Organic or Certified Naturally Grown.
CSA Cost: CSA Cost: 8-week spring share = $230, 24-week summer share = $630, 32-week summer share = $830, 9-delivery winter share = $375 Biweekly shares are available.
Features: multi-farm, eggs, vegan, online-payment, payment-plan
Neighborhoods: bradford-woods, bridgeville, chatham-university, churchill, cranberry, cranberry-township, dormont, downtown, east-liberty, waterfront, fox-chapel, franklin-park, friendship, greentree, greenfield, highland-park, monroeville, morningside, mt-lebanon, north-side, oakland, point-breeze, regent-square, ross-township, schenley-farms, scott-township, sewickley, shadyside, southside, squirrel-hill, strip-district, whitehall

Sarver’s Hill Farm & CSA

438 Old State Route 66, Greensburg, PA 15601
724-834-2334
sarverhillfarm.org
Description: Single-farm CSA offering 20 and 24 week traditional shares over the summer season.
CSA Cost: 20 week share = $510, 24 week share = $59
Features: traditional csa
Neighborhoods: on-farm, latrobe, murrysville, fayette-city, elizabeth